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Changing your mouth and teeth with age

Changing teeth

Over time, there is loss of brightness and cracks in the enamel. Teeth also tend to turn yellow and wear away as a result of attrition, erosion or abrasion. With wear, the dentine of the tooth is more and more exposed and can cause hypersensitivity.

Gums and alveolar bone

With age, the gum loses its elasticity and becomes thinner. These changes make it more susceptible to bacterial infections and loosening (recession) thus helping to bare the roots of your teeth. This exposure of the roots can lead to dentin hypersensitivity.

The bone, for its part, may show signs of resorption thus giving less support and support to the tooth.

Mouth mucosa, cheeks and tongue

Becoming thinner and slimmer, they are more vulnerable to ulcers, trauma and different infections. The ability to heal is also slower.


Saliva has antibacterial and antifungal properties. The older we get, the less saliva we produce. This decrease in salivary flow may result in difficulty swallowing, chewing and digestion, impairing your speech and causing dry mouth (xerostomia). This lack of saliva can also be accentuated by various medications or treatments (radiotherapy), oral breathing and certain diseases. In addition, xerostomia increases the carious risk.

Well sealant and cracks

If you look closely in your child’s mouth, it is possible to notice cracks on the top of the permanent molars and premolars. The presence of these furrows causes food debris and bacteria to accumulate more easily and promote the formation of tooth decay.

Preventative application of sealant inside pits and crevices helps protect the tooth against attack by decay-causing bacteria. For good dental hygiene, we recommend that you combine this process with the daily use of dental floss, as well as regular brushing.

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